Sixth Generation


1187. Ira Wilbur ACKLEY1220 was born on 20 December 1806 in Clarence, Erie, New York, United States.229,395,502,1221,1222,1223 History of Cattaraugus Co., NY by Adams has birth as Lancaster NY
name also listed as Harry "Ira" C Ackley
LDS has birth as ca 1807 states of Gowanda, Cattaraugus Co., NY 635 Between 1850 and 1870 he was a Farmer in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.395,502,503 He was living between 1850 and 1870 in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.395,396,502,503 Ira was living on 30 March 1855 in Kansas.1224 He was living on 22 May 1855 in Lawrence, Douglas, Kansas, United States.1224,1225 KANSAS AFFAIRS. IRA W. ACKLEY called and sworn. Examined by Mr. Reeder: I came into the Territory on the 16th of September, 1854, from Cataraugus county, New York, and settled in this district, and have resided here ever since. I was here on the 30th of March, 1855. I saw a party of strangers come in here, which I heard estimated from six hundred to eight hundred or one thousand, and I should think there were about that number. I think the most of them encamped in a body. I saw their camp. They attended the election that day and voted. They were armed; the most that I noticed had rifles and shot guns, and a great many had revolvers and bowie knives; some of them had clubs. There was music-a drum and fife-and they had flags. They marched once, I think, with music to the polls, and fired their guns. I tried to get to the polls a great many times during the forenoon, but could not succeed; and many who voted had to go over the top of the house, as there was such a crowd they could not get back. In the afternoon they formed in a column two by two, and went up by the window. They stated their object in voting here was to carry the election, and have slavery here. A good many of them said that they would have slavery here, or dissolve the Union, or die. After the election they left. I saw in the afternoon, after the line was formed, some of them would vote and pass back to the end of the line, and pass up and vote again. I noticed three do that, and thought there were many more. Cross examined by Mr. Oliver: I do not remember the names of any of those who made the declaration I have mentioned. One told me he lived near Jefferson city; I bought some Osage orange seed of him. I heard some declare there were numbers here from the north and east who had no more right to vote than they had. I do not remember of hearing them say that there were societies in the north to make this a free State, and they would beat them at their own game. I heard them say that they understood a number from the northern and eastern States, who had recently arrived, were going to vote, and they had the same right as the others He signed a will on 19 September 1885.1222 Ira W's will dated September 19, 1885. He left some property to his daughter referred to as "Mary Wells" as well as his other daughter "Melissa E. Aversion." He gives to his son Orlando "the use, rents and profits of the certain 10 acres of land situated on lot # thirty-nine in the town of Persia which is herein devised to my grandsons Denver and Ira." Ira signed a will between 1888 and 1890 in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.1226 pg 661 He died on 3 October 1889 at the age of 82 in Gowanda, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.229,1220,1223 He signed a will in November 1889 in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.1227 Estate of Ira W Ackley late of Persia Deceased- will proved and letters testamentary issued to Ira W Ackley for executor. Ira appeared in the following News Article from the Olean Democrat on 28 November 1889 in Olean, Cattaraugus, New York, United States Estate of Ira W Ackley late of Persia deceased- will proved and letters testamentary issued to Ira W Ackley for executor He was buried in Broadway Cemetery, Gowanda, Cattauraugus , New York.40,1222,1223 He appeared in the census 1850,1855,1860 & 1870 in New York, United States. Ira was a Carpenter & Millright in Cattaraugus, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.289,1220 He was living in Hidi, Cattarangus , New York.1220,1221 assisted Abaz Allen from VT in building the 1st sawmill at Hidi, Cattarangus Co., NY Biography of1228 The following story was adapted from the book, "History of Cattaraugus County, NY," by Adams; and the book, "The Emigrant Aid Company Parties of 1854," Louise Barry, May 1943, (Vol 12, No 2), pages 115 to 155; and other sources to include Nicholas.htm website on the Descendants of Nicholas Ackley.

Ira W Ackley was the son of Zebulon Ackley and Ester Kelsey. He was born 20 Dec 1806 in Clarence, Erie, New York. He died 3 Oct 1889 in Gowanda, Cattaraugus County, New York and was buried in Broadway Cemetery outside Gowanda. He married Mary Ann Seabrook about 1830. Mary Ann was born on 12 Nov 1812 in Pennsylvania. Mary Ann was a descendant of Captain Robert Seabrook who settled Seabrook Island, South Carolina. Captain Seabrook was one of the founders of Charlestown, South Carolina. Ira's father Zebulon arrived in Clarence area about 1802/3 and in 1804 purchased land in NY Township 12 Range 7 from the Holland Land Company. About 1802/3, Zebulon married Ester Kelsey of Sheldon, Erie, New York. She was the daughter of Stephen Kelsey, Jr., and Betty Hollister.

As a result of the War of 1812, a Cholera epidemic swept across Erie County, New York during the winter of 1812-1813. Ira's father and mother both died in 1813 as a result of the Cholera epidemic. His father died in January and his mother died on 6 July. They were buried in the Clarence Rural Cemetery. When Zebulon died his real estate property was turned over to his father Jeremiah Ackley. When Ester died the four children were placed under the guardianship of their grandfather Jeremiah Ackley. Unfortunately, Jeremiah was killed by a falling tree about 1814 in Lancaster, Erie, New York.

When Jeremiah was killed the property passed to Rufus R Robinson. Rufus also became the guardian of Zebulon and Ester's children on 15 Aug 1814. Rufus was a descendant of John Robinson, Pastor to the Pilgrims. About 1609, the Rev John Robinson and other Separatists settled in Leyden, the Netherlands. Later members of the group became known as the Pilgrims when they immigrated to America and settled in Plymouth. In the 1820's, Rufus Robinson was purchasing land around Hammond Lake in West Bloomfield, Michigan. By 1824, most of the land around Hammond Lake had been purchased by Rufus R Robinson of Erie County, New York.

He was a farmer, carpenter, and millwright. He early settled in Hindi, Cattaraugus, New York. He assisted Abaz Allen from Vermont in building the first sawmill in Hindi. Soon after he purchased 100 acres of woodland on Lot 57, where his son John S Ackley later lived. During most of the time between 1850 and 1870, Ira was a farmer in Persia township in Cattaraugus County. He founded the Ackley Dairy Farm which is still in the Ackley family to this day. The place where he chose his home was near a large spring, which was evidently a resort of the Indians. He found numerous arrowheads, stone axes, and stone implements for skinning game, a stone rasp, and other curiosities. Ira Ackley was elected to several town offices.

He was deputized by Sheriff White to call out the militia and went with them to the Dutch Hill War of 1844-45. The so-called War took place in the Dutch Hill region of eastern Cattaraugus County, New York. The area had been settled by Germans from Wyoming County, Pennsylvania. Some the German settlers made down payments on land from the Holland Land Company but failed to make additional payments over the following years. The heart of the issue was property rights and use of the land. In 1837, the debt owed for the land was assumed by the Devereux Company who tried to get the money plus interest and also prevent the settlers from logging the land because timber represented the primary value of the lands. The company refered to the settlers as "timber thieves." A confrontation took place between Sherrif White and the settlers (now called "Indians") and 11 of the participants were indicted. Finally, on 20 Jan 1845, Sherrif White and Judge Benjamin Chamberlain went to Dutch Hill to persuade the indicted persons to surrender. When the settlers refused, the sherrif appointed several men to return to Dutch Hill and make arrests. The deputized men arrested one settler but fled back to Ellicottville after another encounter with armed and angry "Indians." Rumors flew and Sherrif White prepared to defend Ellicottville against an expected attack by settlers sworn to destroy the land office and the jail if any arrests were made. Another rumor alleged that the Senecas at the Allegheny Indian Reservation had joined the ranks of the Dutch Hill "Indians" as allies. Fearing an attack, Sherrif White called out the militia, and on Sunday evening 26 Jan 1846 eleven hundred men, including Ira Ackley, set out in sleighs for Dutch Hill. They arrived early on Monday morning and found there was no "Indians" and no resistence. The troops surrounded the homes of the leaders of the settlers and they surrended peacefully. The land agents allowed the settlers to remain on their land after signing new contracts for payment.

Ira Ackley was an ardent abolitionist and actively worked to prevent the spread of slavery to the Kansas Territory. He joined the Emigrant Aid Society of Massachusetts that was founded as a transportation company to set up transport immigrants to the Kansas Territory to shift the balance of power (population) so that Free-Staters rather than slave-holders would decide whether Kansas entered the Union as a slave or Free state. Ira Ackley's son-in-law, Anson Alverson, was a member of the 1st party the Emigrant Aid Society sent to Lawrence, Kansas in 1854.

Ira Ackley joined the 2nd party that migrated to Lawerence, Kansas. The second party left Boston on 29 Aug 1854 for Kansas. They traveled by way of Albany, Buffalo, Lake Erie, Detroit, Chicago, Alton, and St Louis. Fare to Kansas City was $25; meals extra, 100 pounds of baggage was allowed per person. The second party started out with 67 people and picked up about twice that number along the way. The second party reached Kansas City on 6 Sep 1854. The first and second parties were united on 11 Sep 1854 in the Wakarusa settlement of Kansas. On 19 Sep 1854, they adopted a Constitution for the government of the "Lawrence Association of Kansas Territory." He was one of the original founders of Lawrence, and he was the millwright who with his son-in-law, Anson Alverson, built the first mill in that city.

He was living on 30 Mar 1855 in Lawrence, Douglas, Kansas. According to the Kansas Affairs, Ira W Ackley was called and sworn and examined by Mr. Reeder. Ira, testified, "I came into the Territory on the 16th of September 1854, from Cattaraugus County, New York, and settled in this district, and have resided here ever since. I was here on the 30th of March 1855. I saw a party of strangers come in here, which I heard estimated from six hundred to eight hundred or one thousand, and I should think there were about that number. I think most of them encamped in a body. I saw their camp. They attended the election that day and voted. They were armed; the most that I noticed had rifles and shot guns, and a great many had revolvers and bowie knives; some of them had clubs. There was music - a drum and fife - and they had flags. They marched once, with music to the polls, and they fired their guns. I tried to get to the polls a great many times during the afternoon, but could not succeed; and many who voted had to go over top of the house, as there was such a crowd they could not get back. In the afternoon they formed a column two by two, and went up by the window. They stated their object in voting here was to carry the election, and have slavery here. A good many of them said that they would have slavery here, or dissolve the Union, or die. After the election they left. I saw in the afternoon, after the line was formed, some of them would vote and pass back to the end of the line, and pass up and vote again. I noticed three do that, and thought there were many more." Cross examined by Mr. Oliver, Ira Ackley stated that: "I do not remember the names of any of those who made the declaration I have mentioned. One told me he lived near Jefferson City; I bought some Osage orange seed off him. I heard some declare there were numbers here from the north and they would beat them at their own game. I heard them say that they understood a number from the northern and eastern States, who recently arrived, were going to vote, and they had the same right as the others.

By 1860, Ira and his family had moved back to their home in Cattaraugus County, New York. His wife, Mary Ann, died in 1885. She is buried in the Broadway Cemetery outside of Gowanda.

He signed a will on 19 Sep 1885. In this will he left some property to his daughter referred to "Mary Wells" as well as his other daughter "Melissa E Alverson." He gave his son Orlando "the use, rents, and profits of the certain 10 acres of land situated on lot number thirty-nine in the town of Persia which is herein devised to his grandsons Denver and Ira.

He signed another will in 1888 or 1889 in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York. He died on 3 Oct 1889 in Gowanda at the home of daugter Melissa E Alverson. The followed appeared in the following new article from the Olean Democrat on 28 Nov 1889, published in Olean, Cattaraugus, New York, "the estate of Ira W Ackley late of Persia deceased - will be proved and letters testamentary issued to Ira W Ackley for executor."

Ira and Mary Ann Seabrook Ackley had the following children: Orlando A Ackley who married Elizabeth Stillman; Melissa E Ackley who married Anson E Alverson; John Seabrook Ackley who married Alzina daughter of William Crandall and Leafy Hill of Persia; Thomas B Ackley deceased; and Mary E Ackley who married Luther N Wells.
He.1229 The Emigrant Aid Company Parties of 1854, by
Louise Barry. May 1943 (Vol 12 No 2) Pages 115 to 155. In the article,
it is cited that Ira W. Ackley as a member of the Second Party which
migrated to Lawrence, Kansas. The Second Party left Boston on 29 Aug
1854 for Kansas. They traveled by way of Albany, Buffalo, Lake Erie,
Detroit, Chicago, Alton, and St. Louis. Fare to Kansas City was $25;
meals extra, 100 pounds of baggage was allowed for each person. The
Second Party started out with 67 people and picked up about twice that
number along the way. The Second Party reached Kansas City on 6 Sep
1854. The First and Second Party were united on 11 Sep 1854 in the
Wakarusa settlement in Kansas. On 19 Sep 1854, they adopted a
Constitution for the government of the "Lawrence Association of Kansas
Territory.
Ira W. ACKLEY, born in Lancaster, N. Y., in 1806, married Mary SEABROOK, a descendant of the English family who settled SEABROOK Island, South Carolina. He early settled in Hidi, and being a millwright assisted Ahaz ALLEN in building the first saw-mill there. Soon after he purchased 100 acres of woodland on lot 57 where his son John S. now lives. The place he chose for his home was near a large spring, which was evidently a resort of the Indians. The present proprietor has found numerous arrowheads, stone axes, and stone implements for skinning game, a stone rasp, and other curiosities. Mr. ACKLEY was elected to several town offices. He was deputized by Sheriff WHITE to call out the militia and went with them to the Dutch Hill war. He joined the Emigrant Aid Society of Massachusetts at the time of border ruffian troubles in Kansas and was one of the original founders of the city of Lawrence, and was also the millwright in building the first mill in that city. He died where his daughter, Mrs. ALVERSON, now lives in 1888. Mrs. ACKLEY died about 1875. Children: Orlando A.; Melissa E. (Mrs. ALVERSON); John Seabrook, who married Alzina, daughter of William CRANDALL, of Persia; Thomas B. (deceased); and Mary, widow of Luther N. WELLS.

Ira Wilbur ACKLEY and Mary Hanna SEABROOK were married circa 1830.229,290,395,502,503,1221,1223,1228 Mary Hanna SEABROOK1220, daughter of SEABROOK and Elizabeth , was born on 12 November 1812 in Pennsylvania.229,290,395,503,1223,1230 Mary, was a descendent of the Seabrook family that settled Seabrook Island, South Carolina. This Seabrook family descends from Captain Robert Seabrook a British sea captain who settled Edisto Island, Charlestown, South Carolina. She died on 20 January 1885 at the age of 72 in Gowanda, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.1220,1223,1230 She was buried in Broadway Cemetery, Gowanda, Cattauraugus , New York.40,1222,1223 Mary appeared in the census 1850, 1860 & 1870 in New York, United States. a descendant of the English family who settled SEABROOK Island, South Carolina

Ira Wilbur ACKLEY-13013 and Mary Hanna SEABROOK-5281 had the following children:

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i.

Orlando A ACKLEY-5282.

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ii.

Melissa E ACKLEY-5283.

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iii.

John Seabrook ACKLEY-5698.

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iv.

Thomas Benton ACKLEY1228 appeared in the census between 1850 and 1860 in New York, United States. living with parents 1860 He was born on 9 December 1838 in Cattaraugus, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.40,395,502,1222,1223 listed as Benton 1850 censes On 3 September 1860 he was a Farm Laborer in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.502 Thomas died from a wound of the brain and spinal column on 31 July 1869 at the age of 30 in Persia, Cattaraugus, New York, United States.40,1222,1223 He was buried in Broadway Cemetery, Gowanda, Cattauraugus , New York.40,1222,1223

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v.

Mary E ACKLEY-5285.